HAMMOND MEATS STOCKYARD LOCATION ICE HARVESTING

EMPLOYEES

MEAT PACKING FIRE

 
 

 
 G.H. Hammond Meat Packing Employees
Hammond, Indiana

 

The Men & Women Who Made It Happen

 

 

 
     
 

 
 

 

 

 

       "The skilled butcher was the aristocrat among the workers at the packing house. He was said to have been usually a large man and the picture of health and well-being. Tales of his strength, skill and habits are legendary. We are told he often drank beef blood from the healthiest animals. His badge of office was a leather apron with which he kept the blood off his clothes. In this apron was a scabbard for his butcher knives which he never allowed out of his sight. The event of each year was the butchers' picnic at Drackert's Grove, the most spectacular part of the program being the contest to determine the most skillful butcher at the packing house. A dead steer was hung from a scaffold for each contestant to skin, dress, and split the carcass. The honors went to the one to complete the task in the shortest time. The splitting of the carcass into halves was the crowning achievement for each contestant, a feat accomplished with such a demonstration of strength and accuracy as to elicit cries of admiration from the crowd of onlookers."

 
     
 

 

 

 

  

 
     
   
   

"In 1895 the highest wage for a ten-hour day at the packing house was $4 for skilled workers and $1.50 for the unskilled. Boys earned 90 cents and women 80 cents for a day's work. In that year about 1,500 workers were employed at the plant. Women were largely used in the manufacture and packing of butterine."

Source: Moore, "The Calumet Region," p. 157.

 
 

 
   You will notice that this is the only work group in which Superintendent Simon Fogg does not join in.  The men here are pictured with knee-high boots because their work area was covered in blood and animal waste.  There are more younger boys in this photo suggesting that the Tripe Department was an entry level position with G.H. Hammond.

Notice too, the hierarchy of all employee groups.  In the first photo, the Office Group sits on chairs with tall backs and arm rests. Then the photographer moves outside to the dock area where workers sit on planks of wood sitting on barrels. The dress is different, too, from suits and ties to overalls and boots. There was something at G.H. Hammond Meat Packing for everyone...

 
 

Source for all photos:  Meat Packing Days

 
 
 
  More advertising cards from the G.H. Hammond Company  

 

  HAMMOND MEATS STOCKYARD LOCATION ICE HARVESTING

EMPLOYEES

MEAT PACKING FIRE